05 November 2018 last updated at 12:35 GMT
 
Meeting in May landed BCCI the enhanced share
Saturday 24 June 2017

Meeting in May landed BCCI the enhanced share
The BCCI had earlier rejected ICC chairman Shashank Manohar’s offer of a $100 million raise
It was a foregone conclusion that the ICC would eventually determine a sum of around $400 million as BCCI’s share of ICC’s revenue for the 2016-23 cycle. Shashank Manohar, ICC chairman, had conveyed to the BCCI during its quarterly meeting in Dubai in April that he had set aside $100 million in addition to the officially announced sum of $293 million.
Amitabh Choudhary, BCCI’s acting secretary, had then not accepted the offer because of a special general meeting resolution which did not give him the option of accepting the money offered by the ICC.
It only gave him the mandate to oppose the new governance and financial structure, if the ICC did not agree to to a sum of $570 million or $610 million as per the 2014 resolution.
At a subsequent SGM, the full members authorised Choudhary to take the matter forward with the ICC and a meeting between Manohar and Choudhary was facilitated by Abhay Apte, president of the Maharashtra Cricket Association. The three met at Apte’s office in Pune on May 22 and worked out a sum of $405 million.
A BCCI functionary kept in the loop right through the informal talks between the BCCI and the ICC said, “Manohar had announced at the BCCI SGM (February 19, 2016) that the BCCI would have to take a 6% cut from the 22% offered in 2014 and that he would not allow India’s share to drop below 15%.
“So the $405 million agreed upon is a close estimate of what was assured at the February 19 SGM.
“The BCCI had adopted a resolution with then Mumbai Cricket Association president Sharad Pawar backing Manohar’s strong belief that the BCCI should help out other full members because they also come to India and play Test / ODI / Twenty20 cricket and that they had supported the BCCI at ICC forums in the past.”
The BCCI voted against the governance and financial models at the ICC quarterly meeting at Dubai in February, with the CoA’s Vikram Limaye in attendance.
But sources revealed that Manohar had not forgotten the assurance he had given at the SGM and that he set aside $100 million taking the other ICC board members into confidence.
The BCCI had asked for nine changes in the governance model; it’s said that Manohar acceded to most of them, importantly giving the right to the members to decide on bilateral series. The assurance on the “bilateral series” aspect was given in April.

It was a foregone conclusion that the ICC would eventually determine a sum of around $400 million as BCCI’s share of ICC’s revenue for the 2016-23 cycle. Shashank Manohar, ICC chairman, had conveyed to the BCCI during its quarterly meeting in Dubai in April that he had set aside $100 million in addition to the officially announced sum of $293 million.

Amitabh Choudhary, BCCI’s acting secretary, had then not accepted the offer because of a special general meeting resolution which did not give him the option of accepting the money offered by the ICC.

It only gave him the mandate to oppose the new governance and financial structure, if the ICC did not agree to to a sum of $570 million or $610 million as per the 2014 resolution.

At a subsequent SGM, the full members authorised Choudhary to take the matter forward with the ICC and a meeting between Manohar and Choudhary was facilitated by Abhay Apte, president of the Maharashtra Cricket Association. The three met at Apte’s office in Pune on May 22 and worked out a sum of $405 million.

A BCCI functionary kept in the loop right through the informal talks between the BCCI and the ICC said, “Manohar had announced at the BCCI SGM (February 19, 2016) that the BCCI would have to take a 6% cut from the 22% offered in 2014 and that he would not allow India’s share to drop below 15%.

“So the $405 million agreed upon is a close estimate of what was assured at the February 19 SGM.

“The BCCI had adopted a resolution with then Mumbai Cricket Association president Sharad Pawar backing Manohar’s strong belief that the BCCI should help out other full members because they also come to India and play Test / ODI / Twenty20 cricket and that they had supported the BCCI at ICC forums in the past.”

The BCCI voted against the governance and financial models at the ICC quarterly meeting at Dubai in February, with the CoA’s Vikram Limaye in attendance.

But sources revealed that Manohar had not forgotten the assurance he had given at the SGM and that he set aside $100 million taking the other ICC board members into confidence.

The BCCI had asked for nine changes in the governance model; it’s said that Manohar acceded to most of them, importantly giving the right to the members to decide on bilateral series. The assurance on the “bilateral series” aspect was given in April.

(Courtesy: The Hindu)

 

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