23 March 2017 last updated at 13:18 GMT
 
States tell CoA: No money, no IPL
Tuesday 07 March 2017

States tell CoA: No money, no IPL
Members want allocated sum to part with venue, CoA will wait for Court to resolve matter
The Supreme Court-appointed Committee of Administrators (COA) is set to face another bouncer.This time, the impending `headache' pertains to the Indian Premier League (IPL), the game's cash cow from which they've consciously tried to stay away so far.
The state associations of the BCCI ­ many of who have voiced their grouse over COA going beyond its remit in following the SC order ­ say they “will not be in a position to part with the infrastructure“ for the IPL 2017 matches to be conducted over the next two months if they are not paid for the same. The current dispensation at BCCI, however, is convinced that this is merely “another way of creating nuisance.“
State associations are paid Rs 60 lakh per IPL match for parting with the venue and infrastructure. The hosting franchise pays Rs 30 lakh of that sum to the association while the rema ining Rs 30 lakh is paid by the BCCI.
Between 2008 and 2011, state associations were paid only by the franchise, which started with Rs 10 lakh first and then went up. In 2012, it was the BCCI's decision to pay an equivalent of that amount to the association.
It is clear that if and when the associations raise this issue officially, it will be left for the Supreme Court to resolve the matter. What is certain is that if a tournament like the IPL is even touched for individual gains, it will be to the detriment of a thriving industry.
It is now either for the COA to clear that payment to the state associations or wait for these state associations to take up the issue in the Supreme Court on March 20, when the BCCI matter will come up for hearing once again.The current BCCI administration is of the view that “should the state associations obstruct with the sole idea of trying to create trouble, they will not be doing themselves a favour“.
Eight state associations -Mumbai, Bengal, Saurashtra, Karnataka, Maharashtra, Punjab, Delhi and Hyderabad ­ will play host to the 10th edition of the IPL, to be played from April 5 to May 21. Each association will get to host seven matches, not including the play-offs. Most associations ­ barring Delhi, being ruled by an interim body ­ haven't given the required underta king to the COA as directed by the Supreme Court and the ones submitted are “conditional“.
While no money has to be paid for the play-offs, state associations still stand to earn Rs 4.2 crore for all league matches scheduled to be hosted. Of that money, Rs 2.1 crore will be paid by the franchises and the remaining half by the BCCI.
The COA understands very well that the IPL is a property best left in the hands of professionals who've been running the show for 10 years now.“And now they (associations) want to harm cricket's biggest property? Let the court take a call on this,“ is how an official put it.
State bodies to skip awards
Majority state associations of the BCCI have now decided to follow Karnataka in “boycotting“ the MAK Pataudi Lecture and the BCCI awards ceremony scheduled in Bengaluru on Wednesday. In line with the decision, not a single association has conveyed to the BCCI that arrangements need to be made for their ticketing, accommodation and transport to attend the event. Associations are peeved at the BCCI's invite that says: “COA is constrained to convey that only those office bearers who are qualified as per SC order are expected to attend".

The Supreme Court-appointed Committee of Administrators (COA) is set to face another bouncer.This time, the impending `headache' pertains to the Indian Premier League (IPL), the game's cash cow from which they've consciously tried to stay away so far.The state associations of the BCCI ­ many of who have voiced their grouse over COA going beyond its remit in following the SC order ­ say they “will not be in a position to part with the infrastructure“ for the IPL 2017 matches to be conducted over the next two months if they are not paid for the same. The current dispensation at BCCI, however, is convinced that this is merely “another way of creating nuisance.“

State associations are paid Rs 60 lakh per IPL match for parting with the venue and infrastructure. The hosting franchise pays Rs 30 lakh of that sum to the association while the rema ining Rs 30 lakh is paid by the BCCI.

Between 2008 and 2011, state associations were paid only by the franchise, which started with Rs 10 lakh first and then went up. In 2012, it was the BCCI's decision to pay an equivalent of that amount to the association.

It is clear that if and when the associations raise this issue officially, it will be left for the Supreme Court to resolve the matter. What is certain is that if a tournament like the IPL is even touched for individual gains, it will be to the detriment of a thriving industry.

It is now either for the COA to clear that payment to the state associations or wait for these state associations to take up the issue in the Supreme Court on March 20, when the BCCI matter will come up for hearing once again.The current BCCI administration is of the view that “should the state associations obstruct with the sole idea of trying to create trouble, they will not be doing themselves a favour“.

Eight state associations -Mumbai, Bengal, Saurashtra, Karnataka, Maharashtra, Punjab, Delhi and Hyderabad ­ will play host to the 10th edition of the IPL, to be played from April 5 to May 21. Each association will get to host seven matches, not including the play-offs. Most associations ­ barring Delhi, being ruled by an interim body ­ haven't given the required underta king to the COA as directed by the Supreme Court and the ones submitted are “conditional“.

While no money has to be paid for the play-offs, state associations still stand to earn Rs 4.2 crore for all league matches scheduled to be hosted. Of that money, Rs 2.1 crore will be paid by the franchises and the remaining half by the BCCI.

The COA understands very well that the IPL is a property best left in the hands of professionals who've been running the show for 10 years now.“And now they (associations) want to harm cricket's biggest property? Let the court take a call on this,“ is how an official put it.

Majority state associations of the BCCI have now decided to follow Karnataka in “boycotting“ the MAK Pataudi Lecture and the BCCI awards ceremony scheduled in Bengaluru on Wednesday. In line with the decision, not a single association has conveyed to the BCCI that arrangements need to be made for their ticketing, accommodation and transport to attend the event. Associations are peeved at the BCCI's invite that says: “COA is constrained to convey that only those office bearers who are qualified as per SC order are expected to attend".

Courtesy: The Times of India

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