18 April 2017 last updated at 06:09 GMT
 
BCCI-Lodha hearing put off once again
Friday 09 December 2016

BCCI-Lodha hearing put off once again
The BCCI-Lodha Committee hearing in the Supreme Court has been put off for the second time in a week; after adjournments on December 5 and December 9, the issue of the Indian board not implementing the Lodha Committee's recommendations in total will now be heard on December 14.
The adjournment was because another case that the Supreme Court was hearing on Friday took too long.
The Supreme Court had last heard the BCCI-Lodha Committee case on October 21, when it passed an interim order asking the board to stop disbursing funds to state associations until the association gave a written resolution that it would adopt the Lodha Committee's recommendations. BCCI president Anurag Thakur and secretary Ajay Shirke were also required to submit an affidavit of compliance in the court by December 3, elaborating on the recommendations already implemented by the board and the steps taken to persuade the state associations to adopt the recommendations in total. 
Since the previous hearing, the Lodha Committee submitted its third status report in the Supreme Court and once again recommended that the BCCI and state office bearers who did not meet the eligibility criteria laid out in the recommendations be removed immediately. It also recommended that GK Pillai, the former home secretary in the federal government, be appointed an "observer" of the BCCI and that he oversee the board's financial transactions. The BCCI rejected the suggestion and also said that the Lodha Committee's inaction had "tremendously hurt" the image of Indian cricket.
The BCCI had remained firm in its stance that it could not force the Lodha Committee's recommendations on its state associations, and that a majority vote was needed to pass them. At several board meetings, the states had voiced opposition to most of the Lodha Committee's recommendations: in particular, the one-state-one-vote policy, the age cap for office bearers, and the limits on tenure.
The Lodha Committee - comprising former Chief Justice of India RM Lodha and retired Supreme Court judges Ashok Bhan and R Raveendran - was formed in January 2015 to determine appropriate punishments for some of the officials involved in the 2013 IPL corruption scandal, and also to propose changes to streamline the BCCI, reform its functioning, prevent sporting fraud and conflict of interest.
In January 2016, the committee released its report, which recommended an exhaustive overhaul of the BCCI's governance and administrative structures. On July 18, the Supreme Court approved the majority of the recommendations and directed the Lodha Committee to supervise the BCCI's implementations of the same. However, despite the Lodha Committee laying out timelines and other directives, the board has not cooperated because its state associations objected to the recommendations.
The BCCI-Lodha Committee hearing in the Supreme Court has been put off for the second time in a week; after adjournments on December 5 and December 9, the issue of the Indian board not implementing the Lodha Committee's recommendations in total will now be heard on December 14.

The adjournment was because another case that the Supreme Court was hearing on Friday took too long.

The Supreme Court had last heard the BCCI-Lodha Committee case on October 21, when it passed an interim order asking the board to stop disbursing funds to state associations until the association gave a written resolution that it would adopt the Lodha Committee's recommendations. BCCI president Anurag Thakur and secretary Ajay Shirke were also required to submit an affidavit of compliance in the court by December 3, elaborating on the recommendations already implemented by the board and the steps taken to persuade the state associations to adopt the recommendations in total. 

Since the previous hearing, the Lodha Committee submitted its third status report in the Supreme Court and once again recommended that the BCCI and state office bearers who did not meet the eligibility criteria laid out in the recommendations be removed immediately. It also recommended that GK Pillai, the former home secretary in the federal government, be appointed an "observer" of the BCCI and that he oversee the board's financial transactions. The BCCI rejected the suggestion and also said that the Lodha Committee's inaction had "tremendously hurt" the image of Indian cricket.

The BCCI had remained firm in its stance that it could not force the Lodha Committee's recommendations on its state associations, and that a majority vote was needed to pass them. At several board meetings, the states had voiced opposition to most of the Lodha Committee's recommendations: in particular, the one-state-one-vote policy, the age cap for office bearers, and the limits on tenure.

The Lodha Committee - comprising former Chief Justice of India RM Lodha and retired Supreme Court judges Ashok Bhan and R Raveendran - was formed in January 2015 to determine appropriate punishments for some of the officials involved in the 2013 IPL corruption scandal, and also to propose changes to streamline the BCCI, reform its functioning, prevent sporting fraud and conflict of interest.

In January 2016, the committee released its report, which recommended an exhaustive overhaul of the BCCI's governance and administrative structures. On July 18, the Supreme Court approved the majority of the recommendations and directed the Lodha Committee to supervise the BCCI's implementations of the same. However, despite the Lodha Committee laying out timelines and other directives, the board has not cooperated because its state associations objected to the recommendations.

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