18 September 2017 last updated at 07:26 GMT
 
SC bars BCCI from releasing funds
Friday 21 October 2016

The Supreme Court on Friday asked the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) not to release funds to state cricket bodies till they promise to implement Lodha panel recommendations.
The apex court also directed BCCI president Anurag Thakur and secretary Ajay Shirke to give undertaking on affidavit, before the Lodha panel and in apex court by December 3, stating how much time they would need to implement reforms.
A bench headed by Chief Justice T S Thakur and comprising Justices D Y Chandrachud and L. Nageswara Rao asked Lodha panel to appoint independent auditors to scrutinise all BCCI accounts.
The judgment, which was pronounced by Justice D Y Chandrachud, also directed the Lodha panel to ask the auditors to scrutinise the high-value contracts given by BCCI.
It directed the Lodha panel to fix a ceiling of high- value contracts of BCCI to be scruutinised by the auditors.
The court will next hear the matter next on December 5. The BCCI president has been asked to personally appear before the apex court during the next hearing.
The top court had earlier barred the BCCI from releasing any funds to its state affiliates until they give an unconditional undertaking that they will comply with the organisational reforms as recommended by the Justice RM Lodha Committee.
Justice TS Thakur had also criticised the BCCI for transferring Rs. 400 crore overnight to its state associations which was against the Lodha panel's recommendations.
In its report submitted to the Supreme Court, the apex court-appointed panel had stated that the BCCI was not implementing its recommendations aimed at reforming the country's cricket governing body.
In its October 1 Special General Meeting, the BCCI had accepted many of the "significant recommendations" of the Lodha Committee, however, it excluded the important ones which have been bone of contention between the cricket body and the Lodha Panel.
The recommendations, which have still not been accepted by the 30-member committee, include one-state one-vote, age limit of 70 years, cooling-off period of three years which included the tenure of the administrators, continue with the five-selectors and keeping to retaining the powers of the president and secretary as per the earlier constitution of the board.

The Supreme Court on Friday asked the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) not to release funds to state cricket bodies till they promise to implement Lodha panel recommendations.

The apex court also directed BCCI president Anurag Thakur and secretary Ajay Shirke to give undertaking on affidavit, before the Lodha panel and in apex court by December 3, stating how much time they would need to implement reforms.

A bench headed by Chief Justice T S Thakur and comprising Justices D Y Chandrachud and L. Nageswara Rao asked Lodha panel to appoint independent auditors to scrutinise all BCCI accounts.

The judgment, which was pronounced by Justice D Y Chandrachud, also directed the Lodha panel to ask the auditors to scrutinise the high-value contracts given by BCCI.

It directed the Lodha panel to fix a ceiling of high- value contracts of BCCI to be scruutinised by the auditors. The court will next hear the matter next on December 5. The BCCI president has been asked to personally appear before the apex court during the next hearing.

The top court had earlier barred the BCCI from releasing any funds to its state affiliates until they give an unconditional undertaking that they will comply with the organisational reforms as recommended by the Justice RM Lodha Committee.

Justice TS Thakur had also criticised the BCCI for transferring Rs. 400 crore overnight to its state associations which was against the Lodha panel's recommendations.

In its report submitted to the Supreme Court, the apex court-appointed panel had stated that the BCCI was not implementing its recommendations aimed at reforming the country's cricket governing body.

In its October 1 Special General Meeting, the BCCI had accepted many of the "significant recommendations" of the Lodha Committee, however, it excluded the important ones which have been bone of contention between the cricket body and the Lodha Panel.

The recommendations, which have still not been accepted by the 30-member committee, include one-state one-vote, age limit of 70 years, cooling-off period of three years which included the tenure of the administrators, continue with the five-selectors and keeping to retaining the powers of the president and secretary as per the earlier constitution of the board.

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