16 June 2017 last updated at 07:30 GMT
 
Trouble mounts for Anurag Thakur
Friday 07 October 2016

Appears like nothing is going right for the president of Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), Anurag Thakur.
The 41-year-old cricket administrator may have landed in trouble, for allegedly asking the International Cricket Council (ICC) in September to write a letter threatening India's suspension if court interferes in its functioning.
The Supreme Court put Thakur in dock on Friday asking him to file an affidavit explaining his conversation with ICC chief executive officer Dave Richardson regarding his alleged request to "write a letter threatening of suspending India if Justice Lodha Committee recommendations are implemented".
The court has given Thankur 10 days to file the affidavit before the matter will come up for hearing on October 17.
On September 10, newspapers had carried a report highlighting how Thakur had asked ICC to write a letter to BCCI and warn it that any government interference in its functioning might lead to the board's suspension.
This was after BCCI filed a review petition in the apex court against the implementation of reforms put forth by Lodha panel.
As per ICC regulations, any interference by government in the functioning of its member boards will not be tolerated.
However, ICC chairman Shashank Manohar had told Richardson to ask for a formal request from Thakur in this regard. But the matter died there as BCCI could not put in a formal request as it would have invited contempt of court proceedings against it.
Richardson later came on record saying that Thakur was not happy with the ICC's refusal to write the letter.
"There were other board (ICC) members present when that request was made by Mr Thakur. As far as I could see, Mr Thakur actually criticised the ICC for not sending the letter," he was quoted as saying.
As per ICC's assessment "the case was different from that of Nepal and Sri Lanka in the past after the governments dissolved the board's elected body and put an ad-hoc committee to run cricket administration".
The SC also barred BCCI from releasing any money to state associations, which have not complied with the reforms suggested by Lodha panel.
The court also directed that not a single penny will be spent from the funds already disbursed by the board on September 29, without passing a resolution to implement SC ordered reforms.
Dna had written on Thursday about how funds were disbursed to 17 state units without it being passed by the special general body meeting on September 30 and October 1.
There are 13 more state units who have not yet received funds from the BCCI. Only Vidarbha and Tripura units have accepted the Lodha recommendations in toto.
The Bench of Chief Justice TS Thakur, Justice AM Khanwilkar and Justice DY Chandrachud had warned the BCCI a day earlier that it could give more time to the board to carry out the recommendations, provided they file an undertaking of compliance or appoint a panel of administrators to effect the transition to new reformed order.
The court also directed BCCI general manager, administration, Ratnakar Shetty to place on record the copies of BCCI resolution that authorised him to file affidavits on its behalf before the Lodha panel.
However, sources in the board told newspapers that there was never a resolution to authorise Shetty.
"I don't remember this item even coming up for discussion in the working committee meetings," said a senior official of the board.
Appears like nothing is going right for the president of Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), Anurag Thakur.

The 41-year-old cricket administrator may have landed in trouble, for allegedly asking the International Cricket Council (ICC) in September to write a letter threatening India's suspension if court interferes in its functioning.

The Supreme Court put Thakur in dock on Friday asking him to file an affidavit explaining his conversation with ICC chief executive officer David Richardson regarding his alleged request to "write a letter threatening of suspending India if Justice Lodha Committee recommendations are implemented".

The court has given Thankur 10 days to file the affidavit before the matter will come up for hearing on October 17.

On September 10, newspapers had carried a report highlighting how Thakur had asked ICC to write a letter to BCCI and warn it that any government interference in its functioning might lead to the board's suspension.

This was after BCCI filed a review petition in the apex court against the implementation of reforms put forth by Lodha panel.

As per ICC regulations, any interference by government in the functioning of its member boards will not be tolerated.

However, ICC chairman Shashank Manohar had told Richardson to ask for a formal request from Thakur in this regard. But the matter died there as BCCI could not put in a formal request as it would have invited contempt of court proceedings against it.

Richardson later came on record saying that Thakur was not happy with the ICC's refusal to write the letter.

"There were other board (ICC) members present when that request was made by Mr Thakur. As far as I could see, Mr Thakur actually criticised the ICC for not sending the letter," he was quoted as saying.

As per ICC's assessment "the case was different from that of Nepal and Sri Lanka in the past after the governments dissolved the board's elected body and put an ad-hoc committee to run cricket administration".

The SC also barred BCCI from releasing any money to state associations, which have not complied with the reforms suggested by Lodha panel.

The court also directed that not a single penny will be spent from the funds already disbursed by the board on September 29, without passing a resolution to implement SC ordered reforms.

Newspapers had written on Thursday about how funds were disbursed to 17 state units without it being passed by the special general body meeting on September 30 and October 1. There are 13 more state units who have not yet received funds from the BCCI. Only Vidarbha and Tripura units have accepted the Lodha recommendations in toto.

The Bench of Chief Justice TS Thakur, Justice AM Khanwilkar and Justice DY Chandrachud had warned the BCCI a day earlier that it could give more time to the board to carry out the recommendations, provided they file an undertaking of compliance or appoint a panel of administrators to effect the transition to new reformed order.

The court also directed BCCI general manager, administration, Ratnakar Shetty to place on record the copies of BCCI resolution that authorised him to file affidavits on its behalf before the Lodha panel.

However, sources in the board told newspapers that there was never a resolution to authorise Shetty.

"I don't remember this item even coming up for discussion in the working committee meetings," said a senior official of the board.

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