18 August 2017 last updated at 07:18 GMT
 
Why Ganguly won’t be BCCI ‘king’
Friday 13 January 2017

Why Ganguly won’t be BCCI ‘king’
Expectation that former India skipper Sourav Ganguly could occupy the vacant position of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) president has been dashed.
The Justice RM Lodha Committee, in a clarification on Thursday, said the Cricket Association of Bengal president will complete his term as office-bearer in the state unit --- he started as joint secretary in 2014 --- in July. With the three-year tenure ending, Ganguly will have to serve a three-year cooling off period before being eligible to contest any post, according to the Lodha recommendations for administrative reform in BCCI.
Technically, Ganguly can head the BCCI, but will still have to step down in July.
The Lodha panel also clarified that no office-bearer made ineligible following the Supreme Court order on January 2 can represent the national body in International Cricket Council meetings.
The panel issued fresh clarifications on Thursday to clear the air over the nine-year cap in cricket administration and lay down the rules about eligibility for representing BCCI.
However, Ganguly, who also headed the BCCI technical committee and was a member of its players’ advisory committee, said on Thursday he has not thought about his future as a cricket administrator once his CAB tenure ends.
“I’ve not thought about anything. We will see what needs to be done,” he said. Ganguly also denied stepping down as the Bengal unit boss. “I have not done so,” he replied when asked.
In the run-up to the Supreme Court order, Ganguly was seen as a candidate to head the Board as president Anurag Thakur faced ouster.
The Lodha panel has issued a seven-point clarification in response to queries following its recommendations on administrative reforms in the Board.
“In keeping with the spirit of the honourable Supreme Court’s judgement, a disqualified office-bearer is no longer to be associated with cricket administration. He/She is disqualified from being a representative or nominee of the member association or the BCCI and cannot discharge any other role in or on behalf of the association or the BCCI. He/She cannot function within the association in any patron or advisory capacity nor be a member of a committee or council,” it said.

Expectation that former India skipper Sourav Ganguly could occupy the vacant position of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) president has been dashed.

The Justice RM Lodha Committee, in a clarification on Thursday, said the Cricket Association of Bengal president will complete his term as office-bearer in the state unit --- he started as joint secretary in 2014 --- in July. With the three-year tenure ending, Ganguly will have to serve a three-year cooling off period before being eligible to contest any post, according to the Lodha recommendations for administrative reform in BCCI.

Technically, Ganguly can head the BCCI, but will still have to step down in July. The Lodha panel also clarified that no office-bearer made ineligible following the Supreme Court order on January 2 can represent the national body in International Cricket Council meetings.

The panel issued fresh clarifications on Thursday to clear the air over the nine-year cap in cricket administration and lay down the rules about eligibility for representing BCCI. However, Ganguly, who also headed the BCCI technical committee and was a member of its players’ advisory committee, said on Thursday he has not thought about his future as a cricket administrator once his CAB tenure ends.

“I’ve not thought about anything. We will see what needs to be done,” he said. Ganguly also denied stepping down as the Bengal unit boss. “I have not done so,” he replied when asked. In the run-up to the Supreme Court order, Ganguly was seen as a candidate to head the Board as president Anurag Thakur faced ouster.

The Lodha panel has issued a seven-point clarification in response to queries following its recommendations on administrative reforms in the Board.

“In keeping with the spirit of the honourable Supreme Court’s judgement, a disqualified office-bearer is no longer to be associated with cricket administration. He/She is disqualified from being a representative or nominee of the member association or the BCCI and cannot discharge any other role in or on behalf of the association or the BCCI. He/She cannot function within the association in any patron or advisory capacity nor be a member of a committee or council,” it said.

Courtesy: Hindustan Times

BCCI seeks govt nod for Asia Cup
'There cannot be an Asia Cup without India or Pakistan,' says a BCCI official
Kumble finally paid his dues by BCCI
The former Indian coach has been paid his dues of close to Rs 1 crore by BCCI